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Modelling High Voltage Effect on Carbon Dioxide Reforming

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posted on 30.06.2022, 09:40 authored by Ibrahim Bakoji

SPARC 2022 Poster Number 9

  

Promax process flow simulator is software for simulation/modelling of engineering designs and troubleshooting. This has been used in the market for over three decades in various field of engineering, such as simulation of chemical plant, distribution, and transmission pipelines, as well as for reservoir simulation etc. It is well-known for its precision and effectiveness. This presentation describes a simulation that was carried out using the Promax process flow sheet simulator to examine the effect of operating parameters like voltage on the performance of the plasma process in terms of reacting gas conversion and product yield. The power required for the plasma, the gap between the positive and negative electrode, voltage, and reactant gas ratios (CH4/CO2) have been shown to have the most significant effects on the performance of carbon dioxide reforming reaction in experimental works (Gallon, 2010; Ozkan et al., 2015; Uwadiegwu, 2017). However, there are few or no process flow simulations in the literature, particularly at the plant scale. Promax was used to model carbon dioxide reforming of methane using nonthermal plasma. The obtained results showed that when the applied voltage was increased from 10kV to 30kV, the conversion of CO2 grew by about 11.7%. In comparison, the conversion of CH4 fattens by 6.39%. The produced CO and H2 increased by 12.1% and 4.8%, respectively, as the applied voltage upsurged from 10kV to 30kV. Conclusively, it could be deduced that any increase in applied voltage will enhance the CH4 and CO2 conversion, and the CO and H2 produced will change as a function of the applied voltage to the process. There was a significant enhancement in the reactant used in the system when high voltage was applied to the reactor, resulting in higher production of CO and H2.

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